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Do you leak when you cough, laugh, jump? Listen to our podcast on reversing incontinence after baby!

When you run, when you sneeze, when you lift something heavy…

Millions of women experience stress incontinence after having a baby.  And millions more will develop incontinence as they age.  But there’s a lot you can do about it, and our podcast discussion this month is all about that.

Tanya spoke with Tasha Mulligan, physical therapist and personal trainer, and creator of the Hab-It: Pelvic Floor DVD.  She’s passionate about helping women like herself rehab their pelvic floors and reverse stress incontinence.

They spoke about how the pelvic floor is related to incontinence, how to properly do Kegels, how rehabbing your pelvic floor is about much more than Kegels, and answered lots of your questions!

You can listen to this interview with the player below, listen with Quicktime, or download the podcast at our free iTunes store!

 

Birth Matters: Ina May Gaskin’s recommendations to improve maternity care

We’ve been reading legendary midwife Ina May Gaskin’s fascinating new book Birth Matters: A Midwife’s Manifesta.

Unlike her other recent books, Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth and Ina May’s Guide to Breastfeeding, this latest book isn’t a practical guide for moms but a policy statement which spells out her recommendations for changing our maternity care system.  It also includes a history of obstetrics/midwifery care, explores sexuality and birth, and discusses feminism and birth, among other topics.  And as with her previous books it’s spiced with captivating birth stories from her many years of practice.

But the heart of the book is a call for women to come together to fix the ways in which our maternity care system is broken.  Gaskin details these problems with U.S. maternity care:

A rising maternal mortality rate (near tripling in California between 1996 and 2006), which doubles the risk of mortality for mothers birthing today compared to their mothers.  This increase is occurring despite despite the fact that the U.S. spends more on maternity care per capita than any mother country in the world.

A flawed mortality reporting system which, according to the CDC, could mask a rate up to three times what is currently reported.  This lack of reliable data leaves the system poorly equipped to make changes necessary to lower the rate.

High rates of unnecessary induction and other interventions in labor and birth, leaving mothers unable to labor and birth normally, and leading to poor outcomes.

The highest recorded cesarean rates, which far exceed recommended levels for safety of mothers and infants.

Here are her recommendations for reform, presented in detail in Birth Matters:

Establish woman-centered maternity care (including midwifery care) as a human right.

Revise medical education to train doctors in the support of normal birth before they study related pathologies.

Establish maternity care standards to ensure evidence-based practice for all women.

Salary physicians instead of paying them based on the number of births they take on.

Make birth centers available to mothers in all parts of the U.S..

Ensure that every maternal death is accurately reported and reviewed.

Give consideration to the young mothers who give birth without knowing they were pregnant.

Recognize postpartum home as a necessity, to avoid preventable outcomes ranging from mortality to postpartum depression.

What do you think of Ina May Gaskin’s recommendations?  What would you add or subtract?  How have the problems she outlines affected you?

 

Tender tush? Some tips for taking care of your perineum after birth

If you’ve had a vaginal birth, taking care of your (likely sore) bottom can be a bit of a job in the early days after your baby’s birth.  Here are some simple things you can do to relieve pain and bounce back quicker:*

Cold compresses.  Many moms use ice packs to reduce swelling and soothe pain in the early hours after birth.  Be sure to wrap cold packs in a soft cloth or other soft material so that the cold pack doesn’t directly touch your tissues. Some moms wet and freeze their pads to create convenient cold compresses.

Sitz baths.  Warm water, especially when infused with healing herbs, can do wonders for tender tissues.  You can make a sitz bath in a bathtub or with a basin that fits over your toilet seat (in the hospital, ask your nurse for help with this).  Added to your bath, our Sitz Bath and Sitz Bath Concentrate soothe sore perineal muscles, reduce swelling, slow bleeding, and help ease the discomfort of hemorrhoids.  Our Sitz Bath Spray can be sprayed directly on your perineum an offers the same relief.  All of our sitz bath products have a zero rating (zero toxins) on the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep database and are made with 100% certified organic ingredients.

Witch hazel.  Witch hazel is an herb which is soothing to sore, swollen tissue, and especially helpful with hemorrhoids.  You can buy witch hazel soaked pads.  You’ll also find witch hazel in our organic Rhoid Balm, which relieves swelling and itching during pregnancy and after birth, and in our sitz bath products.

Peri bottle.  Many moms who have had tears, stitches, or episiotomies find it soothing to spray their perineum (front to back) with warm water after or during urination.  Peri bottles make this easy.  It can be especially helpful to use a peri bottle while urinating if you have stinging pain when using the toilet.

Medications.  Your health care providers can discuss over the counter and prescription medication options that are safe for breastfeeding.  If you have additional questions about pain medications and breastfeeding, you can call the Infant Risk Center for free information from a knowledgeable and breastfeeding-friendly pharmacist.

* This post is not intended as medical advice.  For medical advice, seek the recommendations of your health care provider.

Podcast: How can you avoid getting “pushed” into a birth you don’t want?

We’re very pleased to share a podcast interview with Jennifer Block, the author of Pushed: The Painful Truth about Modern Maternity Care.

Pushed shines a bright light on the state of maternity care in the U.S., from record-high induction and cesarean rates, to the legal obstacles to midwifery.  Whether you’re expecting a baby or want to advocate for change, you’ll want to read this book.

Tanya Lieberman spoke with Jennifer about the ways in which moms are ‘pushed’ or denied care, the projection that the cesarean rate will hit 50%, recent changes in recommendations for VBAC, and what mothers can do to avoid getting ‘pushed.’

You can listen to the podcast with the player below, listen with Quicktime, or download the podcast from our free iTunes store.

 

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